Best design of small space for fruit trees



We are searching data for your request:

Forums and discussions:
Manuals and reference books:
Data from registers:
Wait the end of the search in all databases.
Upon completion, a link will appear to access the found materials.

Best design of small space for fruit trees.

I would like to put 3 dwarf apple, one red, two green and I don’t know which kind should I get, since the apple tree is the first one I need, and the apple tree is about 3 years old.

Is it better to put it on the sunny side and grow fruits year around or is better to put it on the side which gets less sun.

I want to know the best design of small space for fruit trees.

2 Answers

+5 Points

Best answer from my perspective

It is best to avoid putting fruit trees in the sun all of the time because the UV rays can do a number on the fruit tree. It is best to put them in an area where there is some shade all the time, except when the tree is actually fruiting.

In your case, it is best to put the apple tree at the rear of your house, preferably by a window. You should keep the water coming in from the tank under the window, to prevent them from drying out in summer.

Some of the more vigorous apple trees will still have leaves the entire year, and so do better in warmer areas, but it is not always that simple. They do really poorly in regions where winter is very cold, because they have a habit of dropping their leaves and then not sending up new ones. So, your choice is a question of finding the right balance of cold for the season you live in, and what your climate can tolerate.

I have a dwarf apple which is now getting pretty good sized fruit that was started last year. It was on a sunny south facing wall. I have not bothered to look at the shade requirements, I do hope that it is not in the sun all day as it is now starting to yellow and lose it's appeal.

If the apple tree is not getting enough light, then it is going to have an under fruiting year or two. If you had been observing the plant's progress, you might have noticed that the stem was starting to get thicker and bushier over a year ago. This is another indication that the plant is starting to get adequate light.

It is probably better to start with a full-sized tree than to put a small one in an already-fruiting area. That way you can remove the fruit at once if you find the area gets too warm, leaving a good sized tree with a strong root system.

If you are growing your apple tree in a pot, you can still have it under a window. If you do that, you should be able to get rid of the dead wood in the pot at the end of each year. Then you should put the pot on the window sill and let the water drain down through it.

Hi, I'm not sure if I have a dead woody stem of a tree or if I'm a dwarfing rootstock, either way, I'd like to know if I'm doing anything wrong. I'm only growing one apple tree that I put into the ground in 2012. It has no leaves at all, all roots are black, and I'm getting ready to put it back into the ground. It has 4 branches that are in the ground, and the fruit is growing on all of them, but the stems appear to be dead wood, except one which looks dead, but I'm not sure how old it is. Some of the buds are just starting to open, the fruit is mostly green, and I put some organic mulch on it to help retain moisture.

I put the plant in the ground last year in the fall, and everything was fine. It was a cool fall, but not so cold that I could damage the plant.

At this point, I'm not sure what is happening, and I'm afraid if I let the tree stay like this I'm going to lose the tree.

I've read in other articles that rootstocks are more resistant to diseases and viruses. I'm pretty sure the plant I'm growing is an apg. It appears that it has no leaves at all and no sign of life, but I want to be sure before I go back in and throw it out.

Has anyone ever experienced something similar? Any insight would be helpful.

Thanks in advance,

Cory

Cory

Hi Cory,

This kind of situation where you have a tree with no life that’s producing apples and appears dead would be good candidate for pruning or grafting.

You have a rootstock which is good but the apples on these branches are not in great condition.

In my experience many rootstocks don’t produce anything if given minimal nutrients and if you want to produce a large volume of apples you need to either fertilise or be grafted with a variety that will produce a large apple but still be disease and cold resistant.

In my experience many rootstocks don’t produce anything if given minimal nutrients and if you want to produce a large volume of apples you need to either fertilise or be grafted with a variety that will produce a large apple but still be disease and cold resistant.

A single, ungrafted apple variety will produce thousands of fruit, but you would have to be sure your apple variety was highly disease resistant. Unfortunately, I am very unfamiliar with this kind of production.

If I were you I would remove these apple branches and see how the tree recovers. You may end up with more productive branches.

Thank you for your replies! I’ll remove these apple branches and I will keep you posted.


Watch the video: mastorakos: ΠΑΡΤΕΡΙ ΛΟΥΛΟΥΔΙΩΝ ΣΕ ΚΟΡΜΟ ΔΕΝΤΡΟΥ


Previous Article

Cyclamen Dormant Period – Is My Cyclamen Dormant Or Dead

Next Article

When does a persimmon tree bear fruit